Study shows gay Jamaicans have higher rates of mental health issues because of family rejection


While the study has a small sample size and used a convenience sample from human rights and LGBT activist groups, which could signal some bias in my opinion, it is still worthy of notice.
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Negative experiences related to one’s sexual orientation, such as eviction and receiving threats of violence also increased the risk for mental health problems.

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Mental Health Needs of Sexual Minorities in Jamaica

Yohann R. G. White, MBBS, BMedSc, Loraine Barnaby, MBBS, MPH, DM, Antoneal Swaby, MSc, BSc, and Theo Sandfort, PhD
Abstract
This study examined the prevalence of Axis I disorders and associated risk factors in sample of sexual minority men and women in Jamaica, a country that is widely known for its high societal rejection of homosexuality. Poor relationships with family, negative or abusive experiences related to one’s sexual orientation, and greater openness about one’s sexual orientation were independent risk factors for Axis I disorders. Prevention of mental disorders in sexual minorities in Jamaica should focus on rebuilding family support and promoting social acceptance of sexual minorities.
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Some things the study mentioned:


-Twenty-seven percent of participants met DSM-IV-TR criteria for a major Axis I disorder in the past month
-Fifty-three participants reported having had some form of negative or abusive experience related to their sexual orientation, most of them (42%) within the past month leading up to the interview, and a cumulative percentage of 76% within the past 12 months. 
-Bivariate analyses revealed that participants meeting criteria for a major Axis I disorder in the past month were more likely to report having poor relationships with their families
-Persons who reported experiencing withdrawal of family support were more likely to have an Axis I disorder
-Participants with a positive relationship with family were significantly less likely to have a mental disorder
- Negative experiences related to one’s sexual orientation, such as eviction and receiving threats of violence also increased the risk for mental health problems.
-Factors primarily associated with psychiatric morbidity included poor relationships with family, negative experiences related to sexual orientation (in particular being evicted or physically abused)
- Our study demonstrated a particularly high stress exposure level among sexual minorities in Jamaica.
-The majority of participants in this study who experienced some form of homophobic abuse did not receive psychological help, indicating that persons could be underestimating the psychological impact of chronic exposure to these stressors.
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2 responses to “Study shows gay Jamaicans have higher rates of mental health issues because of family rejection”

  1. Justin says :

    Why do you mention clear, corrigible and largely preventable shortcomings of the study then ignore them and publish it anyway? If we werent supposed to take it seriously why are you publishing clearly biased and inconclusive information? If these elements were not important then you wouldn’t have to put a disclaimer. As a matter of fact a study wasn’t needed to say what you wanted to say since a properly devised study wasn’t done anyway. You could have simply stated your opinion which was the most logical opinion to make without the half-baked study.

    • antigayfactcheckbulletin says :

      The study was published so I mentioned it. Every study has its flaws and limitations but it doesn’t mean the entire study is not usable. Despite this study’s flaws they were not major and I acknowledged the study because it corroborates the better studies done abroad which show that LGBT individuals suffer from higher rates of mental disorders because of discrimination. I couldn’t give much opinion because it is a fact check blog and not one that is geared towards opinion.

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